Dishonored Review: An Honor to Play

Dishonored Review: An Honor to Play

 

If Hitman’s latest outting is the example of third person stealth done right, Arkane Studios makes the poster child of first person stealth out of Corvo in Dishonored. It’s not a very easy task to put players in that point of view, but Dishonored nails the mark and sets the bar in one motion.

The world is gorgeously imagined by Half-Life 2’s Viktor Antonov as a Victorian themed sandbox that is just as alive as the many NPC’s holding side conversations of both importance and banter. Go left, and you may discover a door that Corvo can pick to gain entry. Going right can provide different completely different results, presenting you a rat to possess giving you easy entry through a grate. If neither of those presents you with what you want to invest time in, look up and you may be provided a balcony to teleport on top of using one of gaming’s greatest powers, Blink. Dishonored surprised me with how much freedom was given to players' decisions whether it be a path to follow, or if we want to kill somebody or not.

Showing restraint early on makes traversing less complicated later...

Dishonored is all about options and the subtle changes that ripple across Dunwall because of your actions. Sure, it's easy to run into an area with the plethora of abilities at Corvo's disposal, but killing enemies spawns rats throughout the world that are very hungry for meat. Murdering an assassination target earlier in the game can get to future contracts which, in turn, will move their location to a more secure area making it difficult to reach them when it's their time to die. It's not something all players will notice, but showing restraint early on makes traversing less complicated later and also effects the ending. Aiding in my attempt to not kill anybody were many of the secondary characters providing me with information on how to rid of my targets without getting directly involved. Some have very sinister plans for my marks, but I was easily able rationalize their demise in the hands of another. 

Dishonored is about choice. My experience left me in awe as I was constantly wondering what I can do in combat or in my attempt to remain unseen. It's quite a rarity when an experience like this is presented and I could not recommend Dishonored any higher. 

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 -Bruise

 -Bruise



 
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